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Tonstant Weader Reviews

Opinionated Book Reviews.

Category

Inequality

Ethel Rosenberg by Anne Sebba

Ethel Rosenberg is a biography about the woman executed for treason by the U.S. government in 1953. For many people, when they think of her, they see Meryl Streep sitting at Roy Cohn's bedside as he lay dying of AIDS.... Continue Reading →

Decoding the World by Po Bronson and Arvind Gupta

Decoding the World is a collection of essays going back and forth between authors Po Bronson and Arvind Gupta. Each essay is introduced from a real news headline though how directly or tangentially those headlines relate to the subject varies widely.... Continue Reading →

The Black Cabinet by Jill Watts

The Black Cabinet is a history of the informal group of Black federal employees who worked within FDR's New Deal agencies in order to influence them to help Black Americans. They helped ensure that Black people were hired by New... Continue Reading →

Beyond Your Bubble by Tania Israel

Beyond Your Bubble is a short book full of information on how to talk to people with whom you disagree passionately in order to come to a position of mutual respect. It has several exercises to help readers practice their... Continue Reading →

The Address Book by Deirdre Mask

The Address Book explores street addresses and how and where they began and why they matter. But that sounds so dull compared to the fascinating stories that fill this book. Deirdre Mask first discusses why addresses matter. Anyone who has tried... Continue Reading →

Migrating to Prison by César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández

Migrating to Prison traces American's predilection for locking up immigrants. It didn't start with Trump and it didn't start with Obama. In fact, even the famed Ellis Island entry included a detention center. However, we are locking up more people... Continue Reading →

Wilmington’s Lie by David Zucchino

Winston Churchill said, "History is written by the victors." We in the United States know this is too simplistic. After all, the North won the Civil War and the South wrote the history with tales of happily enslaved people who... Continue Reading →

The Finance Curse by Nicholas Shaxson

The Finance Curse is the reason I will not achieve my 2019 GoodReads Reading Challenge of 200 books, but it was worth it. This is a very detailed review of the myriad ways the finance industry is undermining democracy, good... Continue Reading →

Confluence by Zak Podmore

Confluence: Navigating the Personal & Political on Rivers of the New West is a collection of six essays by Zak Podmore that brilliantly connect the rivers he traverses to his own life and the political and social issues that plague... Continue Reading →

The Economists’ Hour by Binyamin Appelbaum

The Economists' Hour is a history of how economists have gained primacy in policy-making in all three branches of government. From big business paying judges $1000 to go on a one-week Florida junket where they were taught regulations are bad and... Continue Reading →

The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls by Mona Eltahawy

The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls is an exciting manifesto to advance women's freedom worldwide. Mona Eltahawy enumerates seven qualities necessary to their liberation, qualities considered the provenance of men and discouraged in women. That's why she calls... Continue Reading →

You Throw Like a Girl by Don McPherson

You Throw Like a Girl is a book about masculinity and its blind spots. The central argument is that we don't raise boys to be men, we raise them not to be women (or gay) and in so doing we... Continue Reading →

How to Be an Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi

How to Be an Anti-Racist rethinks some of the orthodoxies of dismantling racism. It follows Kendi's personal journey from the "respectability politics" of assimilation to the anti-racist understanding that there is nothing wrong with Black culture and that the old... Continue Reading →

Democracy May Not Exist, but We’ll Miss It When It’s Gone by Astra Taylor

Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone is one of those books you might want to get in its physical form so you can shove it full of bookmarks, highlight sentences, write notes, stick little sticky... Continue Reading →

We Are Not Refugees by Agus Morales

Agus Morales is a Spanish poet and journalist who has spent the last several years covering wars and refugees in SE Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. We Are Not Refugees is his effort to capture the vastness of the crisis... Continue Reading →

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